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PDR Certified Help to Determine EHRs That Meet Minimum Drug Safety Requirements

A new drug safety certification program for EHR and ePrescribing platforms that is supposed to “recognize EHRs that meet minimum drug safety requirements” is in the works, according to a recent press release.

PDR Network, the leading distributor of FDA-approved drug labeling, safety and REMS information, and iHealth Alliance, a not-for-profit organization involved in protecting patients and providers, announced the program, “PDR Certified”, on May 10th. Healthcare providers will be able to determine if the EHR system they use currently or will be purchasing meets minimum drug safety requirements.

Because of the influx of EHRs in recent years, it is more important than ever for there to be certain requirements that must be met to ensure patient and provider safety. Nancy Dickey, the chair of the iHealth Alliance said concerning this:

It is vitally important that these systems include standards for drug safety functionality, and that these standards are easy for busy physicians to identify and understand — fortunately, these goals are shared widely and are in sync with those called for by the FDA.

In order for an EHR vendor to be considered “PDR Certified”, the following functions and features must be included in their product:

1. Full FDA Labeling

2. Drug Alerts and Warnings (Safety Alerts, Boxed Warnings, Recalls and REMS Communications)

3. Adverse Drug Event Reporting

4. FDA-compliant patient education or support services.

Any EHR vendor that becomes “PDR Certified”  can display the logo for “PDR Certified”, which will allow prospective and exisiting customers the opportunity to know they meet requirements above. Dr. David Troxel, Medical Director of the Doctors COmpany, said:

Access to full FDA labeling combined with timely delivery of drug alerts is critical to drug safety in any enviornment but particularly in EHRs which play such a large and growing role in care delivery today. PDR Certification will provide an easy to recognize way for our physician members, and all U.S. providers, to know if they system they are using or evaluating lives up to these drug safety standards.

More information on the program can be found at www.PDRCertified.org.

What do you think of having an EHR Drug Safety certification?

June 15, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Permanent EHR Certification Program (ONC-ACB) Delayed – Is Meaningful Use Stage 2 Delay Next?

It doesn’t come as much of a surprise to me to see the news (yes it’s a couple days old now) that the permanent EHR certification program (where ONC-ATCB becomes ONC-ACB) has been delayed. It was set to sunset at the end of this year and it would essentially convert into the permanent EHR certification program.

ONC’s Farzad Mostashari put out a letter describing the delay in implementing the permanent EHR certification program in this letter. Here’s one portion of the letter:

ONC pushed the plan back after it consulted with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), which ONC selected as its approved accreditor (ONC-AA) earlier this year, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which administers the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). ANSI and NIST said they needed more time to complete the approval of testing labs and certification organizations and ONC to review the applications of the certifiers.

Part of the reasoning for this was for the permanent EHR certification to coincide with the final rule for meaningful use stage 2. I guess it makes sense.

The real challenge I have when thinking about the change from temporary to permanent status is, what will really change? To me this feels mostly like a bureaucratic requirement as opposed to some change that actually provides some sort of benefit.

Will an ONC-ACB provide something of more value than a ONC-ATCB does now? I think not. Will EHR vendors go through a different process with an ONC-ACB compared with what they do now with the ONC-ATCB? I can’t imagine they will. Seems the only ones that should be concerned with this are the ONC-ATCB’s.

Plus, if meaningful use stage 2 gets delayed, then will the permanent EHR certification get delayed again too? Now your ears perk up. Not because anyone cares about the permanent EHR certification, but because a delay in meaningful use stage 2 would be something of note.

November 4, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

EHR Diamonds and Snakes – EHR Certification Doesn’t Differentiate

Jim Tate posted an interesting and valuable warning today in his post on HITECH Answers. Here’s his warning in a nutshell:

“My warning is about the mistaken belief that because an EHR or Module has been listed on the CHPL site it must be good or even serve an intended purpose with any degree of usability. That is simply not the case and everyone knows it.”

He goes on to provide more detail regarding his caution and warning:

Stage 1 Certification is not a seal of approval. No one should think the list of Certified Products is a list of equals. Quite a few of the applications are excellent and demonstrate elegant approaches to the electronic documentation of health information. Others are poorly designed, cumbersome, and no provider will ever be satisfied using them. The purpose of certification was not to separate the good from the bad. So tread very carefully and know the list of these applications contains quite a few diamonds, as well as a few snakes.

Jim Tate and I have actually spoken in person about this before. In fact, I’ve tried to get him to write a series on my blogs about what makes an EHR a diamond and which makes an EHR a snake. So far he hasn’t taken my bait, but I’ll keep trying.

Jim is spot on though. Don’t confuse EHR certification for anything more than a means to obtain EHR stimulus money. It provides no other real assurance to you as a provider. Run from EHR sales people who tell you otherwise.

August 18, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.