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Additional FAQs for Guidance on Meeting Public Health Objective for 2015 EHR Reporting Period

On October 6, CMS released the final rule for the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs. To support provider participation in 2015, CMS has released two additional FAQs in response to inquiries about the public health reporting objective in 2015.

FAQ 13409
Question: For 2015, how should a provider report on the public health reporting objective if they had planned to be in Stage 1 meaningful use which required sending a test message and continued submission if successful, but did not require registration of intent?

Answer: We did not intend to require providers to engage in new activities during 2015, which may not be feasible after the publication of the final rule in order to successfully demonstrate meaningful use in 2015. Since providers in Stage 1 in 2015 were not previously required to submit a registration of intent to submit data to meet Objective 10 measures, providers may meet the measures by having sent a test message or by being in production. Providers who have sent a test message can be considered to have met Option 2 of Active Engagement – Test and Validation; providers who are in production can be considered to have met Option 3 of Active Engagement – Production.

FAQ 13413
Question: Does integration of the PDMP (Prescription Drug Monitoring Program) into an EHR count as a specialized registry?

Answer: If the PDMP within a jurisdiction has declared itself a specialized registry ready to accept data, then the integration with a PDMP can count towards a specialized registry. The EHR must be CEHRT, but there are no standards for the exchange of data.

November 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

New EHR Incentive Program FAQs from CMS

On October 6, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released the final rule with comment for the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs. To keep you informed of changes to the programs and how to participate in 2015, CMS has also released three new FAQs providing clarification on how to attest to certain measures for health information exchange, patient electronic access, and other objectives that require patient action.

FAQ 12817
Question: For the Health Information Exchange objective for meaningful use in 2015 through 2017, may an eligible professional (EP), eligible hospital or critical access hospital (CAH) count a transition of care or referral in its numerator for the measure if they electronically create and send a summary of care document using their CEHRT to a third party organization that plays a role in determining the next provider of care and ultimately delivers the summary of care document?

Answer: Yes. An EP, eligible hospital or CAH may count transmissions in this measure’s numerator when a third party organization is involved so long as:

  • The summary of care document is created using certified EHR technology (CEHRT);
  • The summary of care document is transmitted electronically by the EP, eligible hospital or CAH to the third party organization…read the full FAQ.

FAQ 12821
Question: If multiple eligible professionals or eligible hospitals contribute information to a shared portal or to a patient’s online personal health record (PHR), how is it counted for meaningful use when the patient accesses the information on the portal or PHR?

This answer is relevant to the following meaningful use objectives: Patient Specific Education and Patient Electronic Access measure 2.

Answer: If an eligible professional sees a patient during the EHR reporting period, the eligible professional may count the patient in the numerator for this measure if the patient (or an authorized representative) views online, downloads, or transmits to a third party any of the health information from the shared portal or online PHR. The same would apply for an eligible hospital or CAH if a patient is discharged during the EHR reporting period. If patient-specific education resources are provided electronically, it may be counted in the numerator for any provider within the group sharing the CEHRT who has contributed information to the patient’s record if that provider has the patient in their denominator for the EHR reporting period. The respective eligible professional, eligible hospital, or CAH must have contributed at least some of the information identified in the Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program – Stage 3 and Modifications to Meaningful Use in 2015 Through 2017 final rule (80 FR 62807 through 62809) to the shared portal or online PHR for the patient. However, the respective provider need not have contributed the particular information that was viewed, downloaded, or transmitted by the patient. …Read the full FAQ.

FAQ 12825
Question: In calculating the meaningful use objectives requiring patient action, if a patient sends a message or accesses his/her health information made available by their eligible professional (EP), can the other EPs in the practice get credit for the patient’s action in meeting the objectives?

Answer: Yes. This transitive effect applies to the Secure Electronic Messaging objective, the 2nd measure of the Patient Electronic Access (View, Download and Transmit) objective, and the Patient Specific Education objective.

If a patient sends a secure message about a clinical or health related subject to the group practice of their EP, that patient can be counted in the numerator of the Secure Electronic Messaging measure for any of the EPs at the group practice who use the same certified electronic health records technology (CEHRT) that saw and patient during their EHR reporting period.

Similarly, if a patient views, downloads or transmits to a third party the health information that was made available online by their EP, that patient can be counted in the numerator of the 2nd Patient Electronic Access measure for any of the EPs in that group practice who use the same CEHRT and saw that patient during their EHR reporting period.

If patient-specific education resources are provided electronically, it may be counted in the numerator for any provider within the group sharing the CEHRT who has contributed information to the patient’s record if that provider has the patient in their denominator for the EHR reporting period. … Read the full FAQ.

For more information on accurately calculating the numerator for measures, please visit FAQ 8231.

November 10, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

CMS ICD-10 Stats and Metrics

On October 1, 2015 health systems across the country transitioned to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision – ICD-10. This change will enable providers to capture more details about the health status of their patients to improve patient care and public health surveillance.

CMS has been carefully monitoring the transition and is pleased to report that claims are processing normally. Generally speaking, Medicare claims take several days to be processed and, once processed, Medicare must– by law – wait two weeks before issuing a payment Medicaid claims can take up to 30 days to be submitted and processed by states. For this reason, we will have more information on ICD-10 transition in November.  .

With this in mind, CMS is continuing its vigilant monitoring process of the ICD-10 transition and can share the following metrics detailing Medicare Fee-for-Service claims from 10/1-10/27.

Metrics

October 1-27

Historical Baseline*

Total Claims Submitted

4.6 million per day

4.6 Million per day

Total Claims Rejected due to  incomplete or invalid information

2.0% of total claims submitted

2.0% of total claims submitted

Total Claims Rejected due to invalid ICD-10 codes

0.09% of total claims submitted

0.17% of total claims submitted
(estimated based on end-to-end testing)

Total  Claims Rejected due to invalid ICD-9 codes

0.11% of total claims submitted

0.17% of total claims submitted
(estimated based on end-to-end testing)

Total Claims Denied

10.1% of total claims processed

10% of total claims processed

NOTE: Metrics for total ICD-9 and ICD-10 claims rejections were estimated based on end-to-end testing conducted in 2015 since CMS has not historically collected this data. Other metrics are based on historical claims submissions.

It’s important to know help remains available if you experience issues with ICD-10:

October 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Learn about New Requirements for Participation in EHR Incentive Programs

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) recently announced the release of final rules for the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs and the 2015 Edition Health IT Certification Criteria. The rules will be published on October 16, 2015, and are currently on display in the Federal Register.

The EHR Incentive Programs final rule provides new criteria that eligible professionals, eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) must meet in order to successfully participate in the EHR Incentive Programs. The final rule outlines program requirements in 2015 through 2017 (Modified Stage 2) and Stage 3 in 2018 and beyond, and includes a comment period for Stage 3.

The 2015 Edition Health IT Certification Criteria final rule builds on past editions of adopted health IT certification criteria, and includes new and updated IT functionality and provisions that support the EHR Incentive Programs’ care improvement, cost reduction, and patient safety across the health system.

EHR Incentive Programs Final Rule Provisions
Through the new requirements of the EHR Incentive Programs, CMS will expand meaningful use of certified EHR technology to promote health information exchange and improved outcomes. The rule also includes changes to the structure of the EHR Incentive Programs to improve efficiency, effectiveness, and flexibility.

Major policy provisions include:

  • Program modifications to reduce reporting burden, eliminate redundant and duplicative reporting, and to better align the objectives and measures of meaningful use with the Stage 3 requirements.
  • A revised single set of objectives and measures, including a reduction of the overall number of objectives to which a provider must attest.
  • Changes in EHR reporting periods, including a shift to calendar year for all providers and 90-day reporting for 2015.
  • Revisions to attestation and payment adjustment deadlines.
  • Optional Stage 3 reporting in 2017.

For more information about the EHR Incentive Programs final rule, view the Final Rule Fact Sheet that highlights key changes to the EHR Incentive Programs.

To learn more about the ONC 2015 Edition Health IT Certification Criteria final rule, visit: https://www.cms.gov/Newsroom/MediaReleaseDatabase/Fact-sheets/2015-Fact-sheets-items/2015-10-06.html

October 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Updated FAQs on Participation in EHR Incentive Programs

To keep you informed of the latest information on the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, CMS has recently updated three FAQs providing clarification on how to attest to certain objectives and measures.

(FAQ 9690) Question: When reporting on the Summary of Care objective in the EHR Incentive Program, which transitions would count toward the numerator of the measures?

Answer: A transition of care is defined as the movement of a patient from one setting of care (hospital, ambulatory, primary care practice, ambulatory specialty care practice, long-term care, home health, rehabilitation facility) to another. To count toward the Summary of Care objective for providers sharing access to an EHR, the transition or referral may take place between providers with different billing identities such as a different National Provider Identifier (NPI) or hospital CMS Certification Number (CCN) … Read the full FAQ

(FAQ 11984) Question: If an eligible professional (EP) in the EHR Incentive Programs is part of a group practice that has achieved ongoing submission to a public health agency (PHA), but the EP himself/herself did not administer any immunizations to any of the populations for which data is collected by their jurisdiction’s immunization registry during their EHR reporting period, can he/she attest to meeting the measure since they are part of the group practice that is submitting data to the registry?

Answer: If a provider does not administer immunizations, they should not attest to the measure; they must claim the exclusion. If a provider does administer immunizations, but did not have any for a particular EHR reporting period, they are not required to claim the exclusion as long as they have done any necessary registration and testing and are reporting when they do have the data to report.

(FAQ 8231) Question: While the denominator for measures used to calculate meaningful use in the EHR Incentive Programs is restricted to patients seen during the EHR reporting period, is the numerator also restricted to activity during the EHR reporting period or can actions for certain meaningful use measures be counted in the numerator if they took place after the EHR reporting period has ended?

Answer: The criteria for a numerator is not constrained to the EHR reporting period unless expressly stated in the numerator statement for a given meaningful use measure. The numerator for the following meaningful use measures should include only actions that take place within the EHR reporting period: Preventive Care (Patient Reminders) and Secure Electronic Messaging.

For all other meaningful use measures, the actions may reasonably fall outside the EHR reporting period timeframe but must take place no earlier than the start of the reporting year and no later than the date of attestation in order for the patients to be counted in the numerator, unless a longer look-back period is specifically indicated for the objective or measure. This FAQ relates to prior program years and has been archived as of April 10, 2015.

October 1, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Transcription vs IBM Watson Figuring Out Song Lyrics Infographic

I was recently sent this fascinating infographic that pitted IBM’s Watson against transcriptionists trying to transcribe song lyrics. It’s pretty fun to see the results and how they compare. However, I’m not sure it’s really fair to call it IBM Watson. It looks like they used the voice recognition software in Watson to do the voice to text. If they were really using Watson, then they would have done the voice to text and then compared it against all the song lyrics ever written and then produced the exact song lyrics. However, they said that the transcriptionists weren’t allowed to Google the lyrics. I assume the same was true for Watson.

It’s also worth mentioning that song lyrics can be much harder for a computer to hear than just a straight transcription. I also bet my friends at Nuance would argue that their voice recognition would have performed much better. Plus, I wonder how long the transcriptionists took on these songs. A double or triple checked transcription would be very accurate.

All of this said, this infographic and the results of their experiment (specifically stated as non-scientific) illustrates what most of us that have used the technology already know. Transcriptionists are more accurate than voice recognition. The question most people in healthcare make is whether the costs of a transcriptionist is worth that increase in accuracy. That’s the challenge.

Ok, without further ado, here’s the infographic:
Transcription Services versus IBM Watson and Song Mondegreens

September 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

FAQs with Guidance on Switching EHR Vendors Now Available on CMS Website

Question: Can providers that have switched Certified Electronic Health Record (EHR) Technology vendors apply for a hardship exception to avoid the Medicare payment adjustment?

Answer: Yes, if a provider switches EHR vendors during the Program Year and is unable to demonstrate meaningful use, the provider may apply for an Extreme and/or Uncontrollable Circumstances hardship exception and if approved may be exempt from the payment adjustment.

For example, if an eligible professional (EP) switches EHR vendors in 2015 and is unable to demonstrate meaningful use in 2015, the EP can apply for an EHR Vendor Issue hardship, before the July 1, 2016 submission deadline, and be exempt from the payment adjustment in 2017.

Question: What if your product is decertified?

Answer: If your product is decertified, you can still use that product to attest if your EHR reporting period ended before the decertification occurred. If your EHR reporting period ended after the decertification occurred, you can apply for a hardship exception. If the decertification occurs after the hardship exception period has already closed for the payment adjustment year which would be applicable for your reporting period, please contact CMS Hardship Coordinator at EHRinquiries@cms.hhs.gov to apply for a hardship exception under the Extreme and/or Uncontrollable Circumstances category per CMS discretion to allow such an application.

Also, if you are a first time participant at a group practice which is switching products and the product is decertified after the hardship deadline, contact CMS at EHRinquiries@cms.hhs.gov.

September 24, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Accountable Care Organization (ACO) Investment Model

Overview

Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are groups of doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers, who come together voluntarily to provide coordinated, high-quality care to their Medicare patients to help them deliver better care at lower cost.

The goal of coordinated care is to ensure that patients, especially people with chronic conditions, get the right care at the right time, while avoiding unnecessary duplication of services and preventing medical errors.

ACOs represent one part of a comprehensive series of initiatives in the Affordable Care Act that are designed to lower costs and improve care. When an ACO succeeds in both delivering high-quality care and spending health care dollars more wisely, it will share in the savings it achieves for the Medicare program.

Medicare currently offers or is planning to offer several ACO initiatives:

  • Medicare Shared Savings Program
  • Pioneer ACO Model
  • Next Generation ACO Model
  • Advance Payment ACO Model
  • Comprehensive End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Care Initiative

This fact sheet provides a general description of the ACO Investment Model, a new ACO model being offered to support the Medicare Shared Savings Program ACOs.

Summary of the ACO Investment Model

The ACO Investment Model is an initiative developed by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation (Innovation Center) for organizations participating as ACOs in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (Shared Savings Program). The ACO Investment Model is a new model of pre-paid shared savings that builds on experience with the Advance Payment Model to encourage new ACOs to form in rural and underserved areas and current Medicare Shared Savings Program ACOs to transition to arrangements with greater financial risk.

The ACO Investment Model will be available to:

1) New Shared Savings Program ACOs that joined in 2015 or are joining in 2016. The ACO Investment Model seeks to encourage uptake of coordinated, accountable care in rural geographies and areas where there has been little ACO activity, by offering pre-payment of shared savings in both upfront and ongoing per beneficiary per month payments. CMS believes that encouraging participation in areas of low ACO penetration may spur new markets to focus on improving care outcomes for Medicare beneficiaries.

2) ACOs that joined the Shared Savings Program starting in 2012, 2013 or 2014. Here, the ACO Investment Model will help ACOs succeed in the Shared Savings Program and encourage progression to higher levels of financial risk, ultimately improving care for beneficiaries and generating Medicare savings.

Background

CMS is encouraging providers to participate in ACOs through the Medicare Shared Savings Program, which creates financial incentives for ACOs that lower growth in health care costs while meeting performance standards on quality of care and putting Medicare beneficiaries first.

The Innovation Center

The Innovation Center was created by the Affordable Care Act to test innovative payment and service delivery models to reduce program expenditures while preserving or enhancing the quality of care. It is committed to transforming the Medicare, Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Programs and is expected to help deliver better care for individuals, better health for populations, and lower growth in expenditures for Medicare, Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries.

Working in concert with the Shared Savings Program, the Innovation Center is testing the ACO Investment Model and the Pioneer ACO Model, and has sponsored learning activities that help providers form ACOs and improve their results.  More information on all of these initiatives is available on the Innovation Center website at http://innovation.cms.gov.

The ACO Investment Model was developed in response to concerns and available research suggesting that some providers lack adequate access to the capital needed to invest in infrastructure necessary to successfully implement population care management.

Structure of Payments

New ACOs

Under the ACO Investment Model, ACOs that will begin participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program on January 1, 2015 or January 1, 2016 will receive three types of payments:

  • An upfront, fixed payment:  Each ACO receives a fixed payment.
  • An upfront, variable payment:  Each ACO receives a payment based on the number of its preliminarily prospectively-assigned beneficiaries.
  • A monthly payment of varying amount depending on the size of the ACO:  Each ACO receives a monthly payment based on the number of its preliminarily prospectively-assigned beneficiaries.

The structure of these payments addresses both the fixed and variable costs associated with forming an ACO.

Existing ACOs

Under the ACO Investment Model, ACOs that began participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program on April 1, 2012, July 1, 2012, January 1, 2013, or January 1, 2014 will receive two types of payments:

  • An upfront, variable payment:  Each ACO receives a payment based on the number of its preliminarily prospectively-assigned beneficiaries.
  • A monthly payment of varying amount depending on the size of the ACO:  Each ACO receives a monthly payment based on the number of its preliminarily prospectively-assigned beneficiaries.

The structure of these payments addresses both the fixed and variable costs associated with making ongoing investments to improve care coordination for existing ACOs.

Recovery of ACO Investment Model Payments

For ACOs already participating in the Shared Savings Program, CMS will recover the ACO Investment Model payments through an offset of an ACO’s earned shared savings. ACOs selected to receive ACO Investment Model payments will enter into an agreement with CMS that details the obligation to repay ACO Investment Model payments.

If the ACO does not generate sufficient savings to repay the ACO Investment Model payments as of the first settlement for the Shared Savings Program, CMS will continue to offset shared savings in subsequent performance years and any future agreement periods, or pursue recovery where appropriate.

For ACOs new to the Shared Savings Program in 2015 and 2016, CMS will recover payments from earned shared savings for as long as the participant remains in the Shared Savings Program ACO. CMS will pursue full recovery of pre-paid shared savings from any ACO that does not complete its initial Shared Savings Program agreement period or the full term of the ACO Investment Model agreement.

Eligibility/Selection

The ACO Investment Model is expected to help provide support to organizations whose ability to invest in infrastructure and redesigned care processes would be improved with additional access to capital.

In order to be eligible for the ACO Investment Model, an ACO already participating in the Shared Savings Program must meet the following criteria:

1) The ACO must be accepted into and participate in the Shared Savings Program. The ACO’s first performance period in the Medicare Shared Savings Program must have started in 2012, 2013, 2014, or 2015 or will start in 2016.

2) If the ACO started in the Medicare Shared Savings Program in 2012, 2013 or 2014, it has completely and accurately reported quality measures to the Medicare Shared Savings Program in the most recent performance year, excluding ACOs that started in 2015 or that will start in 2016.

3) The ACO has a preliminary prospective beneficiary assignment of 10,000 or fewer beneficiaries for the most recent quarter, as determined in accordance with the Shared Savings Program regulations.  However, ACOs that started the Medicare Shared Savings Program in 2015 or will start in 2016, and are determined to be from a rural area using the application selection criteria, are permitted to exceed the 10,000 beneficiary assignment limit.

4) The ACO does not include a hospital as an ACO participant or an ACO provider/supplier (as defined by the Shared Savings Program regulations), unless the hospital is a critical access hospital (CAH) or inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS) hospital with 100 or fewer beds.

5) The ACO is not owned or operated in whole or in part by a health plan.

6) The ACO did not participate in the Advance Payment Model.

During the selection process, the ACO Investment Model will target new ACOs serving rural areas, areas of low ACO penetration, and existing ACOs committed to moving to higher risk tracks. CMS will also give preference to ACOs that provide high quality of care, achieved their financial benchmark, and demonstrate exceptional financial need.

Application Process

The application period for ACOs that started in 2014 and 2015 — or will start in 2016 — will open July 1st, 2015 and close July 31, 2015.

CMS staff will review applications for the applicant organization’s ability to meet criteria identified in the solicitation. All applicants are also required to be accepted into the Shared Savings Program, in accordance with program rules.

Participants

In the first round of applications for ACOs that started in the Medicare Shared Savings Program in 2012 and 2013, the ACO Investment Model has accepted six ACOs into the model.

Additional Resources

More information about the ACO Investment Model, including the Request for Application, is available on the Innovation Center website at http://innovation.cms.gov/initiatives/ACO-Investment-Model/.  Any questions about the program can be directed to AIM@cms.hhs.gov

For information about the Shared Savings Program, please see: www.cms.hhs.gov/sharedsavingsprogram/.

CMS Blog:   http://blog.cms.gov/2015/06/25/affordable-care-act-initiative-supports-care-coordination-in-rural-areas/

June 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Access All of CMS’ Sessions at HIMSS15

Visit the CMS eHealth Events page to access all of CMS’ HIMSS15 program sessions. An overview of each individual session can be found below.

Sunday, April 12

  • Opening Keynote: CMS on Federal Quality Reporting (Session QU1): Dr. Kate Goodrich, Director of the Quality Measurement and Health Assessment Group, outlines 2015 clinical quality measurement and reporting requirements and how they align with quality performance and public reporting through CMS quality programs.

Monday, April 13

  • CMS EHR Incentive Programs Overview (Session 10): CMS provides an update on EHR Incentive Programs participation and gives an overview of the Modifications to Meaningful Use in 2015-2017 proposed rule.
  • CMS Meaningful Use Stage 3 Requirements (Session 40): CMS presents an outline of the proposed Stage 3 requirements.

Tuesday, April 14

  • Keynote: The Intersection of Quality and Innovation at CMS (Session 67): Dr. Patrick Conway, Chief Medical Officer, outlines how CMS envisions health IT as a key component of health care transformation.
  • CMS Quality Strategy (Session 86): Dr. Kate Goodrich presents the overall quality strategy for CMS, and explains how it will be used to achieve the agency’s vision.
  • CMS Quality Reporting Update (Session 116): CMS discusses 2015 CQM reporting requirements and provides an overview of the PQRS, IQR, HVBP, and VBM quality reporting programs.

Wednesday, April 15

  • CMS Future Directions in Quality Measurement (Session 131):Panelists discuss current challenges and the future of quality measurement and quality measure development.
  • CMS Meaningful Use Stage 3 and ONC 2015 Edition Certification Criteria Changes (Session 160): CMS and ONC provide an overview of the Stage 3 and 2015 Edition Health IT Certification Criteria proposed rules.
  • Improving Health Care Delivery through Collaboration with Lean Tools (Session 176): Industry experts outline how Lean tools have led to cost savings, increased collaboration, and provide high quality products.

May 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Rule to Change MU Reporting Period to 90 Days is Issued

Today, CMS issued a new proposed rule for the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs to align Stage 1 and Stage 2 objectives and measures with the long-term proposals for Stage 3.

The modifications would allow providers to focus more closely on the advanced use of certified EHR technology to support health information exchange and quality improvement.

The new rule proposes a change in the reporting period for meaningful use from one year to 90 days in 2015.

Proposed Changes for EHR Incentive Programs
Together with the proposed Stage 3 notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) issued on March 20, 2015, the proposed rules align and merge the “stages” of meaningful use requirements.

The proposed rule changes the programs by:

  • Streamlining reporting by removing redundant, duplicative, and topped-out measures
  • Modifying patient action measures in Stage 2 objectives related to patient engagement
  • Aligning the EHR reporting period for eligible hospitals and CAHs with the full calendar year
  • Changing the EHR reporting period in 2015 to a 90-day period to accommodate modifications

April 10, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.