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Ruined Healthcare IT Words

I know that I spend far too much time talking, writing, tweeting, posting, commenting, obsessing over everything EMR and Healthcare IT related, but doing so has had some interesting consequences when it comes to certain words or abbreviations. Let me give you some examples of Healthcare IT words or abbreviations that have been tainted one way or another.

Meaningful – I honestly can’t even use this word any more. Meaningful Use has ruined the word meaningful for me. I definitely can’t use the word meaningful in healthcare anymore without cringing. It’s like a permanent built in pun for meaningful now. Plus, meaningful just isn’t meaningful anymore because it’s been used so much. Meaningful will be forever tainted in my vocabulary.

PHR – I expect we’re going to see the general death of the word PHR. Too many failed EHR softwares have ruined this word. I’m sure we’ll still have many of the functions and features that PHR software offers and many PHR software will be around, but we’re going to see a new branding of what they do. Yesterday I heard one called Patient Relationship Management (PRM I guess) which could be a good replacement for the tainted PHR term.

mHealth – This word is a bit like PHR in that we’re still going to see plenty of mobile health, but I think the term mHealth is going to go away. Eventually mobile will just be an extension of healthcare IT and healthcare in general. We’ll still see some residual naming, but most won’t differentiate.

I’m sure there are a lot more. What other healthcare words or abbreviations have lost life for you?

April 10, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Health Plan and Employer PHR

After the fall of Google Health, many had written off PHR (Personal Health Record) software as dead and gone. I can’t say that I had much hope for PHR software myself. Although, some of the recent moves by PHR vendor NoMoreClipboard have me pausing to reconsider what value a PHR could provide. My gut tells me they might want to distance themselves from the toxic term, PHR, but they’re definitely being creative with the platform they created.

Right before HIMSS I covered how the PHR could help to facilitate an ACO and Patient Centered Medical Home. Both ACO and PCMH are much more popular terms these days and quite frankly many are still trying to figure out how to make them a reality. I could see a PHR helping to make this happen.

Just yesterday, NoMoreClipboard announced a partnership with Healthx which makes PHR software available to Payers and Employers. I know that many in the investment world are arguing against trying to get money from payers and employers for wellness programs as a startup company. Although, NoMoreClipboard is not a startup company and I have little doubt that integrating their PHR with the Healthx portal was not easily accomplished. I’ll be interested to hear how many of the 12 million people who use Healthx end up using the PHR as well.

Add in the meaningful use stage 2 requirements that PHR can fulfill and maybe just maybe the PHR are back in style. Although, they’re not the PHR that most thought it would be. Instead, it’s taking on new forms that give it an interesting new life.

April 6, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

PHRs – A Difficult Pill to Digest?

A report from Manhattan Research earlier this month had some interesting statistics on consumer access to electronic medical records. According to the report, 56 million Americans accessed the patient records available from their medical providers’ EMRs, and another 41 million said they were interested in viewing their medical records online. Manhattan Research gets this information from surveying 8745 adults online and by phone in Q3 2011. Assuming the statistical basis for extrapolating this survey of 8745 people to the entire US population is sound (Nielsen does something similar to arrive at its daily media numbers), that’s a good 97 million people who are interested enough to have already accessed their records or are interested enough to, if given a chance.

But you know what’s the surprising tidbit? 140 million Americans have not used and are not interested in viewing their own medical records online! Predictably enough the report attributes this massive reluctance to an older or less tech-savvy population. I’m not sure how this will play out with the less tech-savvy population. With the older generation, this might just translate to access and maintenance of personal PHRs falling on authorized proxies – caregivers or adult children. Maybe this will span an entirely new profession – personal health advisers of sorts – whose sole job is to view your online medical records, explain them in plainspeak and research and offer up options. Certainly something to think about!

October 31, 2011 I Written By

Priya Ramachandran is a Maryland based freelance writer. In a former life, she wrote software code and managed Sarbanes Oxley related audits for IT departments. She now writes about healthcare, science and technology as well as traditional news features.

Electronic Health and the Non-Digerati

Everytime we discuss something innovative and interesting to do with our lives, my friend comes up with yet another app or game we should design and market via the App Stores and live richly and happily forever. And I, true to my vaguely creative pursuits, always state that not every problem has a solution rooted in IT or mobile phones or the next iThingamajig. While this is a strange admission to make on a blog that is titled “EMR Thoughts”, bear with me. For example, there are entire classes of problems that IT cannot solve – such as whether the water in a village well is potable, or ensuring that there is enough food for a growing world populace, our collective Farmville skills notwithstanding.

Today I was reading John Moore’s report of the recent SFO Health2Con, where I felt he addressed a health version of the same discussion my friend and I have. More on that later. First the reviews.

Moore says:
- the Health2Con demos sported cleaner interfaces, better UI,
- had more realistic business models (fewer free/Freemium models).

On the not-so-great news side:
- mobile health is cheap and the “it” technology of the moment but Moore doesn’t think anyone’s figured out how to use it,
- demos rarely give enough detail to be instructive,
- And if he cannot deal with any more demos that call for gamification or Facebookization as a way to approach health (I hear him)

Then about midway through the post, he made a comment that made me sit up and take note:

“[Health IT Vendors] want to make a difference. That passion is contagious. Unfortunately, that passion appears to be confined to the digerati [digital literati]

Maybe the most disturbing part of the event was the on-stage interview with a mother of eight kids (she was white, middle age and clearly upper middle class) showing how her family is tapped into the quantified self movement with the various Apps they use to track their health and fitness. This is not representative of the broad swath of the American populace who are the ones that will drive our healthcare system off the proverbial cliff. It is that grandmother in Indiana who is caring for her diabetic, overweight husband, two grandchildren, a daughter suffering from an addiction and a son-in-law who is unemployed and has no health insurance that we need to talk to, have up on stage to tell us what they need to better manage their health and interaction with the healthcare system.”

Another post on iHealthbeat clearly examines the motivations behind our health IT thrust.

EMRs/EHRs will make healthcare efficient and reduce costs. Engaged, empowered patients will take charge of their own health and again bring down health costs. These are some assumptions we hold to be true.

The problem with these assumptions that they don’t take into account the non-IT savvy grandmother problem. How do we reach her and others like her? A particularly trenchant comment from commenter Kim Slocum on iHealthBeat says:

We know that half the US population consumes essentially all the nation’s health care resources.

I’m guessing that a large proportion of high car(sic) utilizers are also off-line and currently unreachable via this medium (e.g. dual eligibles and substantial fraction of the Medicare population). If that’s true, a lot of the “Health 2.0″ buzz is misguided if it is thought to be a vehicle to bend the cost curve via “consumer engagement.”

Something to think about. John Moore’s post is here, and the iHealthbeat post is here.

October 3, 2011 I Written By

Priya Ramachandran is a Maryland based freelance writer. In a former life, she wrote software code and managed Sarbanes Oxley related audits for IT departments. She now writes about healthcare, science and technology as well as traditional news features.

Data Security in the Age of Self-logged Health

Over at EMR and EHR I have a post going about the self-logging trend, in which people log their medical and other observations on a regular basis. I’m fascinated by the trend, but as an IT person, I shudder at the data nightmares this movement will leash if it becomes widespread.

Quantified Self, a major web hub for self-trackers, has posts on monitoring devicest hat can measures the vitals of people up to 10 meters away, and microsensor embedded mindfulness pills that transmit data to your phone when ingested.

So if someone steals my smartphone, does it mean that not only can s/he spam-text all my friends, but s/he can access all my health logs and PHRs that only my HIPAA compliant provider’s office and EMR systems were supposed to get their hands on?

Indeed, a news story in Med City News says that physical theft, not hacking, is the major concern for mobile storage devices. It’s far easier to flick an iPhone lying on somebody’s desk than to devote the brain- or computing power needed to hack into an EHR system from a reputable vendor.

Med City News reports that during the period from 2009-2011, there were 116 cases of data breaches involving at least 500 patient records (breaches that exposed fewer than 500 records were not included). Physical loss of devices accounted for a whopping 60% of security breaches.

As the Med City News piece notes:

HIPPA violations aren’t happening in the cloud. Rather, they’re happening in the doctor’s office, hospital IT closets, cars, subways, and homes.

Think about how much more this problem can be compounded if health logging becomes practise du jour?

Bottomline: Self-tracking may yet revolutionize healthcare, but could we as individuals potentially jeopardize our own data security? Possibly. It might be a fad among tech geeks but it needs some thinking through from an EMR/EHR perspective.

August 29, 2011 I Written By

Priya Ramachandran is a Maryland based freelance writer. In a former life, she wrote software code and managed Sarbanes Oxley related audits for IT departments. She now writes about healthcare, science and technology as well as traditional news features.

Patient Centered Care Options


#Technology empowers #physicians, and #patients. patient- centered care options include; #ehealth, #PHR, #telemedicine #mhealth
@EMRAnswers
Linda Lia Stotsky

Interesting list of options for patient centered care. I talk a bit about this in this healthcare IT and Active Patient care video. I wonder what other patient centered care options are missing from this list.

June 1, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.