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ONC Leadership Transition – Dr. Vindell Washington Replaces Karen DeSalvo as National Coordinator for ONC

Secretary Burwell sent the following letter to announce the change.

Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce two important staff transitions.  Starting Friday, August 12, Dr. Karen DeSalvo will continue to serve as the Acting Assistant Secretary for Health and transition out of her dual role as National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.  I have asked Dr. Vindell Washington to serve as National Coordinator, overseeing the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC).

Karen has served tirelessly as the National Coordinator since joining the Department in January 2014.  Under her leadership, ONC has advanced interoperability across the health system – which underpins progress on a wide range of Department and Administration priorities.  She has also made significant advances to the Health Information Technology Certification Program to promote and expand the safe and secure flow of electronic health information when and where it matters most for individuals and clinicians.  During her tenure, ONC has worked with other federal partners and the private sector to update the Federal Health IT Strategic Plan and develop a Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap, both of which chart a person-centered path for improving health outcomes by unlocking health data through tools like open application programming interfaces (APIs).  She has also co-chaired the Department’s Delivery System Reform efforts, which set historic goals and worked to leverage the resources of the Department to build a more person centered health system that encourages more coordinated care.  As many of you know, I asked Karen to take on the duties of Assistant Secretary for Health in October 2014 during the Ebola crisis.  Since that time, she has provided critical leadership on the Department’s public health agenda while simultaneously serving as National Coordinator.  As Acting Assistant Secretary for Health, Karen has been instrumental in supporting families affected by the water crisis in Flint, in promoting nutritional and physical fitness through the development of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the events surrounding the 60th Anniversary of the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition, and in leading the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps.  This year, she launched Public Health 3.0, an innovative cross-sector approach to strengthening local public health and building healthier communities.  I am deeply grateful to Karen for her leadership and for her incredible service in both of these roles for nearly two years.

I am also very pleased to announce that Dr. Vindell Washington will become National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.  Many of you know Vindell from his excellent work as Principal Deputy National Coordinator at ONC, where he has also worked closely with leaders throughout the Department on key initiatives, such as Delivery System Reform, the Precision Medicine Initiative, and the opioid crisis.  In his capacity as National Coordinator, Vindell will continue to lead the Administration’s efforts to leverage health information technology to reform how we pay for and deliver care; transform health research and innovation to empower clinicians, individuals and communities to manage their health; and oversee implementation of the Federal Health IT Strategic Plan and the Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap to unlock digital health data and ensure it is widely accessible, usable, and transferable throughout the public and private sectors.

Please join me in congratulating Karen and Vindell.  And thank you for your dedication as we continue to sprint to the finish line in these final months of the Administration.

Sincerely,
Sylvia M. Burwell
Secretary

August 11, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Remarks of CMS Acting Administrator Andy Slavitt at the Marketplace Innovation Conference

Welcome. And thank you for coming to a session that allows us to look at a deeper level at what is happening inside the Health Insurance Marketplace. And I’m not talking about what’s in the headlines, but below the surface– what’s happening with millions of Americans as they get coverage– many for the first time– and also how the system is adapting. At the same time, the consumer is beginning through the Marketplace to shape many of the changes in health care as they make decisions about the coverage and care they want. My focus today isn’t really just on the success stories, of which I see many, but on the lessons we have learned and are still learning from what’s going on inside and across the Marketplace.

I stood up here a year ago and reflected on another program which served millions of people as it reached not its third year of operation, but its 50th– the Medicare program.

Before it became the beloved program that millions of Americans rely on for their health and financial security, Medicare had, for those of you that know the history, fairly controversial beginnings and has gone through a number of evolutions. In large part, Medicare has been successful because it has adapted to the progress of medicine and the needs of the consumer, moving from a medical benefit to prevention to the pharmacy and now to coordinated care models. Medicare today is not only a leading force in value-based care, but it also offers widely popular consumer choice and competition for services and benefits from private plans across Medicare Advantage. The Health Insurance Marketplace, in many ways, picks up right there, bringing private sector competition and services to make health care available in an even more open market fashion– and creating greater opportunities for us to learn to serve consumers successfully.

As I reflect on the progress of the Marketplace, I will cover three important topics:

-First, that the Marketplace is succeeding by almost any benchmark, but it is still in its early trial and error stage. Progress won’t be even and for the first five years, we will continue to be in a learning and experimentation period– where a lot will be tested before best practices are more widely developed.

-Second, that the Marketplace, stepping back from the daily headlines, is a highly strategic opportunity for those who see health care evolving into a more B2C market to create new competitive advantages.

-And, third, is that even though we are in the learning and experimentation stage, we are confident we have the tools to make sure the market is stable and succeeds for the long term

Success but Early

Secretary Burwell talked this morning about how far we’ve come thanks to the ACA and thanks to so many communities across the country– the many physicians and clinicians, consumer advocates, assisters, health plans and hospitals who have worked together to have a remarkable impact. We’ve brought the uninsured rate to a record low and for the first time, our country is providing access to care for people regardless of their medical condition or how much money they make. Competition has worked to create more affordable choices. Last year, as 4 million new consumers signed up for coverage, over 90 percent of them had an average of 3 insurance companies to choose from, translating into 50 plan options. Two-thirds of HealthCare.gov customers had the option of selecting a plan with a monthly premium of $75 or less after tax credits. And thanks to tax credits, consumer’s rate increases averaged only 4 percent.

But more important is what consumers are getting for their money. Commonwealth reports that consumers say they can afford primary care and prescription drugs they just couldn’t afford before. And a good-sized majority are satisfied with their coverage. So we are beginning the process, in community after community across America, of re-connecting consumers to the health care system. Employer-sponsored coverage has not been disrupted and yet employees now have options to move jobs without fear of their families being unable to afford and obtain coverage. And contrary to what some headlines may suggest, the Marketplace has launched at and maintained costs well below CBO estimates. This is true for both consumers and the government– even as we provide care more comprehensively and to many who had conditions that had gone untreated.

While this represents a good start, we are in the very early stages– particularly, in the context of how programs like Medicare developed. And the Marketplace is right in the middle of what i will call a 5 year “learning and experimentation stage.” During these early years, consumers are getting educated about their options, while market participants– payers and care providers– learn their needs and experiment with the best ways to meet those needs. We are hearing promising approaches every day. But it’s not every day, or even every decade, that a new market totaling in the $10s of billions of dollars is created and launched across the country– and in places as diverse as rural North Dakota and Center City Philadelphia– where consumers have a diverse set of health needs, languages, cultures and incomes. So today, I hope we recognize that while we have learned many things, we are still only in this first stage of learning how best to bring affordable high quality care and service to this new market.

Strategic opportunity with consumerism

A fair question is why is it worth investing in all of this learning in all of this experimentation to serve the individual consumer market.

What makes the Marketplace an important strategic opportunity is very simply how squarely it puts power into the hands of the consumer. I mentioned this when I talked about the development of Medicare into Medicare Advantage and Medicare Part D, but the Marketplace is consumerism in the purest form. Over the years, the consumer has been much talked about but had very little power to shape what they wanted and paid for. There have been a lot of forces over the years that have shaped health care. Until now, everyone but the consumer has had a say in it.

The Marketplace gives the consumer a voice they have never had before. And every day, the Exchange gives us unprecedented insight into how consumers behave and what they want from the health care system. There’s a short list of learnings and a far longer list of things to be learned.

Let me start with some of things that we have learned.

-First, Marketplace consumers are much more engaged and increasingly educated about what they purchase particularly compared to other health care consumers. 70percent of renewing consumers on the Federal exchange– seven-zero– came back to the exchange to proactively choose a plan instead of opting automatic enrollment. That creates millions of opportunities for consumers to find the right offering at every open enrollment. As they say in my home state of Minnesota, the hockey capital of Minnesota, many more shots on goal means more opportunities to score– useful as plans experiment with different offerings.

-The second learning is that many consumers actually want to shop for their health care, in addition to their health coverage. Last year, the Marketplace began to offer consumers the option of selecting plans not by looking at the plan first– but by first finding a hospital or physician or prescription . . . then looking at which health plan offers them. Even in a pilot year, consumers chose this path 3.6 million times in just the 38 Federal marketplace states.

-Third, consumers want access to routine services without a deductible, with 8 in 10 consumers selecting plans which provide direct services outside of their deductibles like primary care and generic drugs. Health plans are responding in what I think is a promising early example of the consumer shaping a need and the market fulfilling it.

-Finally, consumers are saying loudly and most clearly that affordability matters more to them than it does when they select a plan through an employer– and is the most important concern. 90 percent of people have selected bronze or silver plans. And those large number of consumers who came back to shop? Those who switched plans saved over $500. So if consumers want savings, what are they willing to compromise on? According to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation report, consumers would much prefer a narrower network to a higher deductible or higher premium. This needs to be explored more as it opens the door, not just to narrow networks, but to innovative contracting and network strategies. While we have long wrestled with affordability as a country, the Marketplace allows us to see it in a new way– through the eyes of a consumer as they seek out high-quality care they can afford. And that reminds us– the millions of us who work in health care– that affordability and affordable care must be a part of everyone’s job.

So, while we’ve learned a lot about consumer preferences, there is still a longer set of questions that can be explored and experimented with over the next two years. And here are seven of mine but I know there are many others.

-How do we reach out to and connect with communities that are still left behind?

-What role will quality ratings and consumer reviews play in shaping the market and in improving quality as they are piloted and promoted?

-What role will exposing the actual cost of services play in consumer decision making and in increasing affordability?

-Will consumers choose the ease of a more standard set of “simple choice” benefits or will they opt for more customization?

-What about consumer loyalty? Working on health means building relationships with consumers and I expect this to be a big area of learning. There are examples of highly active markets where people can switch frequently, like cell phone service, music subscriptions or auto insurance. Competitors in those areas have found innovative ways to build long-term loyalty. Several companies are aggressively experimenting on the Marketplace. One, Centene, with its Ambetters product, offers a loyalty account to consumers and deposits money for consumers to use towards deductibles, coinsurance, and other health care spending.

-Next, what are innovative and consumer friendly ways to help consumers manage the costs of care — particularly in rural or other under-served locations? Companies are experimenting with enhanced primary care access, telemedicine, personalized health interventions, and other approaches you’ve heard today. These innovations will be ripe for scaling well beyond the Marketplace.

-Finally, what Marketplace specific contracting approaches will create aligned incentives and reduce the underlying unit costs that are a significant part of a consumer’s premium? Health plans must be successful in partnering with hospitals– who have seen a significant benefit from the ACA in reduced bad debt and increased patient flow– to lower the cost of care for consumers.

The point is that consumerism brings a trial and error phase with new approaches to everything from network strategy, to care management models, to new product approaches, benefit designs and new customer retention. Many of the companies in this room and a number of others have found success and have passed that on to consumers in the form of lower and more predictable costs and innovative services. Others haven’t yet but are beginning to follow best practices or look for other competitive advantages. And some will end up as more pure B2B companies. In the age of Uber and the consumerization sweeping our economy, we need to allow everyone the opportunity to innovate in this space. Outside of health care, the B2C economy has upended businesses like stock trading, travel and even data storage that once had only a limited consumer presence but now give consumers the ability to do for themselves on their mobile phones what they couldn’t before.

For a number of health plan CEOs that I talk to, their view of the Marketplace represents the opportunity to accelerate their organizations into this B2C world and get in synch with consumer demands as many of them see health care continuing to shift across all areas from B2B to B2C. In our notice of rulemaking last year, we asked explicitly for ways we could make innovation and testing of new ideas and approaches easier and must look for more opportunities and flexibilities ahead.

Market Stability

Finally, as in all markets, strategies won’t succeed the first time, every time. Over the course of these five years, we need to allow for continued experimentation. But problems that have plagued certain health care markets for years, lack of access, higher prices, poor social determinants of health also won’t get solved overnight. Unlike the Medicare program, the Marketplace is a complete private-sector solution to covering the uninsured and competition and innovation take some time to work. Gaps, like low competition or higher costs in some rural communities that have existed for years, will remain and be even more visible while we all work on solutions to address them.

Part of our job in the Administration and overseeing the marketplace development is to create a predictable and level playing field for consumers, health plans and care providers and to create stability in these early years, even through these natural bumps and to allow for this experimentation.

Even as the market signs up millions of new consumers in record numbers, we are paying rigorous attention to adjustments that are needed as the Marketplace matures. We have an experienced team of career operators and actuaries, who have come from both the private sector and directly from our Medicare Advantage and Part D operations where we know how to set up and operate large successful marketplaces with a variety of risk structures. This team studies the data and meets regularly with all market participants and takes a strategic view to determine what adjustments are warranted.

This past January, I committed to complete a thorough review and making of adjustments on what we have learned to date. And over the past several months, we have taken a set of actions which strengthen the risk pool, limit upward pressure on rates, and provide a strong foundation for the Marketplace for the long term. This process is a continual ongoing commitment but we have made meaningful progress so far.

-First, we systematically review our policies towards Special Enrollment Period (SEP) sign ups. We eliminated many SEPs that were unnecessary or subject to abuse, clarified the process and added validation requirements and enforcement for those who have a need to enroll during a SEP.

-Second, we have proposed steps to align risk adjustment to account specifically for consumers who may need Marketplace coverage for only a partial year, reducing the unintended consequences. One of the aims of the Marketplace is to be there for people when people need the coverage and when people find work, insurance companies shouldn’t be penalized.

-Third, we have proposed further enhancements to risk adjustment so health plans can invest in serving sicker, hard to treat populations. This begins with incenting everyone to invest in the data and analytics to understand their members better.

-Fourth, we are providing health plans with earlier and better information for rate filings to reduce surprises and help them better predict the cost of medical care for enrollees and price their policies appropriately.

-Fifth, we have announced several actions that both help consumers get or keep the right coverage and improve the risk pool: by closing short term coverage loopholes; by significantly improving our Data Matching process to prevent consumers from unnecessarily losing coverage; and, by improving the transition for Medicare eligible consumers out of the exchange and on to Medicare.

-And, of course, in recognition of the still early stage we’re at with the end of the 3-year reinsurance program, the one-year tax holiday of $13.9 billion will also help stabilize premiums next year.

And later this year, we will talk about our innovative effort to focus on reaching young people in the fourth Open Enrollment period.

These changes will give health insurers, supported by state departments of insurance, the ability to become more confident in putting together affordable offerings for consumers as they finalize rates over the summer and fall. And more broadly, as new areas emerge, I am highly confident in the focus and expertise of the career staff at CMS, and at the tools at their disposal, to continue to make the Marketplace attractive, stable and successful.

Close

In closing I would just like to emphasize a few points. I originally came to CMS to help lead the turnaround of HealthCare.gov and participate in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Thanks to the passage of the ACA, we have finally moved past the place where many of us have spent our careers– in debates about how we might address the uninsured or improve care, to a time when can now get busy actually covering people. It has been and is uniquely rewarding to be a part of. But health care didn’t automatically become affordable and accessible the day the law passed. It has taken incredible effort to see a system that hasn’t changed in a long long time begin to build this new market, but much more will be learned before best practices are more harmonized.

For all our success to date, new coverage must only be the start of things. We have the opportunity to change health care in America like we did 50 years ago at the dawn of Medicare and Medicaid, back when 1/3 of seniors lived in poverty to a time, now, when less than 10 percent of seniors live in poverty. And if we learn and experiment in these early years, we are just getting started. And part of the next leg of the development is not just how people’s lives change in profound ways, but how the consumer can force changes on the health system that wouldn’t happen– or happen as quickly– otherwise. Progress won’t be a straight line, but we are committed to working side by side with all of you in what will have far reaching impact to improving health care across this country. Thank you for all of the incredible hard work and innovation.

June 9, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Evolution of Communication in Healthcare

The following is a guest blog post by Erik Kangas, Founder of LuxSci.

Thanks to technological breakthroughs, communication in healthcare has evolved by leaps and bounds from the old days of paper filing systems, faxes, and phone calls. Although those methods are still widely used, there are faster ways to keep patients in touch with their medical practitioners, doctors, and nurses. Yet with a multitude of benefits come new risks: data breaches, unencrypted messages, and willful neglect that could bring about serious penalties from HIPAA. In order to fully take advantage of all that technology has to offer, the healthcare industry needs to know proper usage policies and to enforce adherence to HIPAA regulations. We might not be in the age of pagers anymore, but that just means that more precautions practitioners need to embrace the newly evolving world of healthcare communication.

Let’s take a look at how these methods of communication have changed over the years and what it all means for the security of ePHI.

Pagers
Anyone involved in the healthcare sector has surely encountered a pager at some point in time. Healthcare is one of the last industries to use this aging technology, but messaging systems that are easier and faster to respond are slowly replacing them. With so many smartphones and devices that can instantly let you know whether there’s an emergency, there’s less reason to carry around a separate bulky pager.

An article at HealthITSecurity has this to say about pagers: “Communicating internally via pagers could still have some benefits, but there are now secure messaging capabilities that can assist with routine health issues, address patient questions or concerns, help monitor patient conditions, while also ensuring that patients can properly manage their own conditions.” In other words, with technology that’s so much quicker and more efficient, it might be worth finally letting go of the beeper in your pocket and switching to something that can do everything a pager can and more.

Pagers may not be as efficient as current tech, but certain organizations still believe they serve a purpose, especially critical messaging.

Email
Email has become increasingly important in healthcare, increasing the scope of everyone’s efforts toward protecting patient privacy. Explained in this whitepaper about HIPAA and email, this security applies not only to personal information, but all Protected Health Information (PHI) –including a patient’s administrative, financial, and clinical information. Any health information related to an identifiable individual that is transmitted or maintained via email, or another medium, falls under HIPAA’s definition of PHI. That’s a huge amount of information that needs safeguarding if you want to continue using email to transmit healthcare data.

Ensuring that data remains encrypted on laptops, desktop computers, and all other devices is key to staying HIPAA compliant. While encryption can be costly to implement, it’s worth it to keep patients’ PHI (and other data) secure – and without it, an organization risks paying monumentally more in fines, in the case of a data security breach.

Given that data breaches frequently and increasingly occur in the healthcare sector, organizations need to ensure the continued safety of their patients’ data for both financial and personal reasons.

It’s also a wise idea to sign up with a security company that can handle the HIPAA compliancy of your inbound and outbound emails, as well as the security of your network as a whole. However, it’s still up to you to train your staff, review your HIPAA security policies, and keep a copy of the HIPAA Business Association Agreement that you signed with the security company.

Text Messages
Texting is pervasive as a method of healthcare communication, including using text messages to confirm appointments or deliver lab results to anxious patients. There are also plenty of texts exchanged between doctors and nurses in hospital environments, with many messages containing some form of patient information. All these transmissions fall under HIPAA regulations, and it’s very easy to unintentionally text patient data that could be intercepted, sent unencrypted, or stored in an external location like the cloud.

Sending health information via text is a clear HIPAA violation – even with seemingly harmless messages, like appointment reminders. The only case in which texting health information may not violate HIPAA is when the text is sent to a patient who has preemptively signed the proper consent form. Without patient consent and proper documentation, an organization can be fined up to $50,000 per text message, if the messages are found to be in violation of HIPAA’s rules. That’s a massive penalty for any organization.

As with email, it’s important to make sure that you encrypt and decrypt text messages properly, whether through common carriers, specialized apps for decryption, or customized programs that allow users to send and receive HIPAA-compliant messages without the worry of breaking regulation. You can send text messages securely, but it requires training and a financial cost to ensure the information stays safe and only the intended recipient reads it.

The Future of Compliant Messaging
“It’s not enough to decide it’s time to ‘jump on the bandwagon’ or secure messaging,” says HealthITSecurity. “Healthcare organizations need to realize that this communication is part of an evolutionary process, and it’s necessary to implement a system that can easily integrate with the facilities’ current capabilities.” Organizations need to recognize they can’t do compliance in various messaging systems piecemeal or from one staff member to another, they need to make it a blanket effort that ensures everyone is onboard. And while it may create a more convenient system, the legal ramifications of any slipups can more than outweigh the cost of encryption programs or specialized apps.

As long as there are security protocols in place, we’ll continue to see a growing role for secure messaging technology in healthcare.

Communication in healthcare was and is always about making services easier and more convenient for both medical staff and patients alike. With the constantly evolving nature of technology, more organizations can expand their services and share information faster than ever before. As long as HIPAA regulations and cybersecurity are in place, the healthcare sector ought to continually evaluate what new high-tech solutions work for them—and what old traditions could still have a place.

May 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Providers Must Attest to 2015 EHR Incentive Program Requirements by March 11, 2016 at 11:59 PM EST

The attestation deadline for the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program is only 3 days away!

Eligible professionals, eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Medicare EHR Incentive Program must attest using the Medicare & Medicaid EHR Incentive Program Registration and Attestation System no later than Friday, March 11, 2016 at 11:59 p.m. ET.

Medicaid EHR Incentive Program participants should refer to their respective states for attestation information and deadlines. Certain Medicaid eligible professionals may use the Registration and Attestation System as an alternate attestation method to avoid the Medicare payment adjustment (80 FR 62900 through 62901).

To attest to the EHR Incentive Programs in 2015:

  • Eligible Professionals may select an EHR reporting period of any continuous 90 days from January 1, 2015 (the start of the 2015 calendar year) through December 31, 2015.
  • Eligible Hospitals/CAHs may select an EHR reporting period of any continuous 90 days from October 1, 2014 (the start of the federal fiscal year) through December 31, 2015.

March 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

CMS ICD-10 Stats and Metrics

On October 1, 2015 health systems across the country transitioned to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision – ICD-10. This change will enable providers to capture more details about the health status of their patients to improve patient care and public health surveillance.

CMS has been carefully monitoring the transition and is pleased to report that claims are processing normally. Generally speaking, Medicare claims take several days to be processed and, once processed, Medicare must– by law – wait two weeks before issuing a payment Medicaid claims can take up to 30 days to be submitted and processed by states. For this reason, we will have more information on ICD-10 transition in November.  .

With this in mind, CMS is continuing its vigilant monitoring process of the ICD-10 transition and can share the following metrics detailing Medicare Fee-for-Service claims from 10/1-10/27.

Metrics

October 1-27

Historical Baseline*

Total Claims Submitted

4.6 million per day

4.6 Million per day

Total Claims Rejected due to  incomplete or invalid information

2.0% of total claims submitted

2.0% of total claims submitted

Total Claims Rejected due to invalid ICD-10 codes

0.09% of total claims submitted

0.17% of total claims submitted
(estimated based on end-to-end testing)

Total  Claims Rejected due to invalid ICD-9 codes

0.11% of total claims submitted

0.17% of total claims submitted
(estimated based on end-to-end testing)

Total Claims Denied

10.1% of total claims processed

10% of total claims processed

NOTE: Metrics for total ICD-9 and ICD-10 claims rejections were estimated based on end-to-end testing conducted in 2015 since CMS has not historically collected this data. Other metrics are based on historical claims submissions.

It’s important to know help remains available if you experience issues with ICD-10:

October 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Transcription vs IBM Watson Figuring Out Song Lyrics Infographic

I was recently sent this fascinating infographic that pitted IBM’s Watson against transcriptionists trying to transcribe song lyrics. It’s pretty fun to see the results and how they compare. However, I’m not sure it’s really fair to call it IBM Watson. It looks like they used the voice recognition software in Watson to do the voice to text. If they were really using Watson, then they would have done the voice to text and then compared it against all the song lyrics ever written and then produced the exact song lyrics. However, they said that the transcriptionists weren’t allowed to Google the lyrics. I assume the same was true for Watson.

It’s also worth mentioning that song lyrics can be much harder for a computer to hear than just a straight transcription. I also bet my friends at Nuance would argue that their voice recognition would have performed much better. Plus, I wonder how long the transcriptionists took on these songs. A double or triple checked transcription would be very accurate.

All of this said, this infographic and the results of their experiment (specifically stated as non-scientific) illustrates what most of us that have used the technology already know. Transcriptionists are more accurate than voice recognition. The question most people in healthcare make is whether the costs of a transcriptionist is worth that increase in accuracy. That’s the challenge.

Ok, without further ado, here’s the infographic:
Transcription Services versus IBM Watson and Song Mondegreens

September 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Accountable Care Organization (ACO) Investment Model

Overview

Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are groups of doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers, who come together voluntarily to provide coordinated, high-quality care to their Medicare patients to help them deliver better care at lower cost.

The goal of coordinated care is to ensure that patients, especially people with chronic conditions, get the right care at the right time, while avoiding unnecessary duplication of services and preventing medical errors.

ACOs represent one part of a comprehensive series of initiatives in the Affordable Care Act that are designed to lower costs and improve care. When an ACO succeeds in both delivering high-quality care and spending health care dollars more wisely, it will share in the savings it achieves for the Medicare program.

Medicare currently offers or is planning to offer several ACO initiatives:

  • Medicare Shared Savings Program
  • Pioneer ACO Model
  • Next Generation ACO Model
  • Advance Payment ACO Model
  • Comprehensive End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Care Initiative

This fact sheet provides a general description of the ACO Investment Model, a new ACO model being offered to support the Medicare Shared Savings Program ACOs.

Summary of the ACO Investment Model

The ACO Investment Model is an initiative developed by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation (Innovation Center) for organizations participating as ACOs in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (Shared Savings Program). The ACO Investment Model is a new model of pre-paid shared savings that builds on experience with the Advance Payment Model to encourage new ACOs to form in rural and underserved areas and current Medicare Shared Savings Program ACOs to transition to arrangements with greater financial risk.

The ACO Investment Model will be available to:

1) New Shared Savings Program ACOs that joined in 2015 or are joining in 2016. The ACO Investment Model seeks to encourage uptake of coordinated, accountable care in rural geographies and areas where there has been little ACO activity, by offering pre-payment of shared savings in both upfront and ongoing per beneficiary per month payments. CMS believes that encouraging participation in areas of low ACO penetration may spur new markets to focus on improving care outcomes for Medicare beneficiaries.

2) ACOs that joined the Shared Savings Program starting in 2012, 2013 or 2014. Here, the ACO Investment Model will help ACOs succeed in the Shared Savings Program and encourage progression to higher levels of financial risk, ultimately improving care for beneficiaries and generating Medicare savings.

Background

CMS is encouraging providers to participate in ACOs through the Medicare Shared Savings Program, which creates financial incentives for ACOs that lower growth in health care costs while meeting performance standards on quality of care and putting Medicare beneficiaries first.

The Innovation Center

The Innovation Center was created by the Affordable Care Act to test innovative payment and service delivery models to reduce program expenditures while preserving or enhancing the quality of care. It is committed to transforming the Medicare, Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Programs and is expected to help deliver better care for individuals, better health for populations, and lower growth in expenditures for Medicare, Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries.

Working in concert with the Shared Savings Program, the Innovation Center is testing the ACO Investment Model and the Pioneer ACO Model, and has sponsored learning activities that help providers form ACOs and improve their results.  More information on all of these initiatives is available on the Innovation Center website at http://innovation.cms.gov.

The ACO Investment Model was developed in response to concerns and available research suggesting that some providers lack adequate access to the capital needed to invest in infrastructure necessary to successfully implement population care management.

Structure of Payments

New ACOs

Under the ACO Investment Model, ACOs that will begin participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program on January 1, 2015 or January 1, 2016 will receive three types of payments:

  • An upfront, fixed payment:  Each ACO receives a fixed payment.
  • An upfront, variable payment:  Each ACO receives a payment based on the number of its preliminarily prospectively-assigned beneficiaries.
  • A monthly payment of varying amount depending on the size of the ACO:  Each ACO receives a monthly payment based on the number of its preliminarily prospectively-assigned beneficiaries.

The structure of these payments addresses both the fixed and variable costs associated with forming an ACO.

Existing ACOs

Under the ACO Investment Model, ACOs that began participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program on April 1, 2012, July 1, 2012, January 1, 2013, or January 1, 2014 will receive two types of payments:

  • An upfront, variable payment:  Each ACO receives a payment based on the number of its preliminarily prospectively-assigned beneficiaries.
  • A monthly payment of varying amount depending on the size of the ACO:  Each ACO receives a monthly payment based on the number of its preliminarily prospectively-assigned beneficiaries.

The structure of these payments addresses both the fixed and variable costs associated with making ongoing investments to improve care coordination for existing ACOs.

Recovery of ACO Investment Model Payments

For ACOs already participating in the Shared Savings Program, CMS will recover the ACO Investment Model payments through an offset of an ACO’s earned shared savings. ACOs selected to receive ACO Investment Model payments will enter into an agreement with CMS that details the obligation to repay ACO Investment Model payments.

If the ACO does not generate sufficient savings to repay the ACO Investment Model payments as of the first settlement for the Shared Savings Program, CMS will continue to offset shared savings in subsequent performance years and any future agreement periods, or pursue recovery where appropriate.

For ACOs new to the Shared Savings Program in 2015 and 2016, CMS will recover payments from earned shared savings for as long as the participant remains in the Shared Savings Program ACO. CMS will pursue full recovery of pre-paid shared savings from any ACO that does not complete its initial Shared Savings Program agreement period or the full term of the ACO Investment Model agreement.

Eligibility/Selection

The ACO Investment Model is expected to help provide support to organizations whose ability to invest in infrastructure and redesigned care processes would be improved with additional access to capital.

In order to be eligible for the ACO Investment Model, an ACO already participating in the Shared Savings Program must meet the following criteria:

1) The ACO must be accepted into and participate in the Shared Savings Program. The ACO’s first performance period in the Medicare Shared Savings Program must have started in 2012, 2013, 2014, or 2015 or will start in 2016.

2) If the ACO started in the Medicare Shared Savings Program in 2012, 2013 or 2014, it has completely and accurately reported quality measures to the Medicare Shared Savings Program in the most recent performance year, excluding ACOs that started in 2015 or that will start in 2016.

3) The ACO has a preliminary prospective beneficiary assignment of 10,000 or fewer beneficiaries for the most recent quarter, as determined in accordance with the Shared Savings Program regulations.  However, ACOs that started the Medicare Shared Savings Program in 2015 or will start in 2016, and are determined to be from a rural area using the application selection criteria, are permitted to exceed the 10,000 beneficiary assignment limit.

4) The ACO does not include a hospital as an ACO participant or an ACO provider/supplier (as defined by the Shared Savings Program regulations), unless the hospital is a critical access hospital (CAH) or inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS) hospital with 100 or fewer beds.

5) The ACO is not owned or operated in whole or in part by a health plan.

6) The ACO did not participate in the Advance Payment Model.

During the selection process, the ACO Investment Model will target new ACOs serving rural areas, areas of low ACO penetration, and existing ACOs committed to moving to higher risk tracks. CMS will also give preference to ACOs that provide high quality of care, achieved their financial benchmark, and demonstrate exceptional financial need.

Application Process

The application period for ACOs that started in 2014 and 2015 — or will start in 2016 — will open July 1st, 2015 and close July 31, 2015.

CMS staff will review applications for the applicant organization’s ability to meet criteria identified in the solicitation. All applicants are also required to be accepted into the Shared Savings Program, in accordance with program rules.

Participants

In the first round of applications for ACOs that started in the Medicare Shared Savings Program in 2012 and 2013, the ACO Investment Model has accepted six ACOs into the model.

Additional Resources

More information about the ACO Investment Model, including the Request for Application, is available on the Innovation Center website at http://innovation.cms.gov/initiatives/ACO-Investment-Model/.  Any questions about the program can be directed to AIM@cms.hhs.gov

For information about the Shared Savings Program, please see: www.cms.hhs.gov/sharedsavingsprogram/.

CMS Blog:   http://blog.cms.gov/2015/06/25/affordable-care-act-initiative-supports-care-coordination-in-rural-areas/

June 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Access All of CMS’ Sessions at HIMSS15

Visit the CMS eHealth Events page to access all of CMS’ HIMSS15 program sessions. An overview of each individual session can be found below.

Sunday, April 12

  • Opening Keynote: CMS on Federal Quality Reporting (Session QU1): Dr. Kate Goodrich, Director of the Quality Measurement and Health Assessment Group, outlines 2015 clinical quality measurement and reporting requirements and how they align with quality performance and public reporting through CMS quality programs.

Monday, April 13

  • CMS EHR Incentive Programs Overview (Session 10): CMS provides an update on EHR Incentive Programs participation and gives an overview of the Modifications to Meaningful Use in 2015-2017 proposed rule.
  • CMS Meaningful Use Stage 3 Requirements (Session 40): CMS presents an outline of the proposed Stage 3 requirements.

Tuesday, April 14

  • Keynote: The Intersection of Quality and Innovation at CMS (Session 67): Dr. Patrick Conway, Chief Medical Officer, outlines how CMS envisions health IT as a key component of health care transformation.
  • CMS Quality Strategy (Session 86): Dr. Kate Goodrich presents the overall quality strategy for CMS, and explains how it will be used to achieve the agency’s vision.
  • CMS Quality Reporting Update (Session 116): CMS discusses 2015 CQM reporting requirements and provides an overview of the PQRS, IQR, HVBP, and VBM quality reporting programs.

Wednesday, April 15

  • CMS Future Directions in Quality Measurement (Session 131):Panelists discuss current challenges and the future of quality measurement and quality measure development.
  • CMS Meaningful Use Stage 3 and ONC 2015 Edition Certification Criteria Changes (Session 160): CMS and ONC provide an overview of the Stage 3 and 2015 Edition Health IT Certification Criteria proposed rules.
  • Improving Health Care Delivery through Collaboration with Lean Tools (Session 176): Industry experts outline how Lean tools have led to cost savings, increased collaboration, and provide high quality products.

May 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

HIMSS Formally Submits Comments on ONC on Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap

In an April 3rd letter to the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC), HIMSS submitted its final comments in response to ONC’s Connecting Health Care for the Nation: A Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap.

In an April 3 letter to the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC), HIMSS submitted its final comments in response to ONC’s Connecting Health Care for the Nation: A Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap.

HIMSS overall supports ONC’s tenets of the Interoperability Roadmap for an interoperable health IT infrastructure.  The Interoperability Roadmap lays out a plan that builds on what HIMSS has already invested in: standards that enable the foundation for interoperability today, and processes to test and certify that health IT systems implement those standards consistently and according to constrained implementation guidance.  In its comments, HIMSS is recommending ONC focus on six key ideas:

  • The plan put forth by ONC to advance interoperability requires well-coordinated governance processes that include involvement from federal partners, the private sector, payers, and the patient community, with robust incentives for each domain to buy-in to the process
  • Many of the timelines put forth in the Interoperability Roadmap for the three, six, and ten-year timeframes for critical actions are too aggressive and need to be reevaluated, with the exception of the privacy and security provisions
  • HIMSS applauds ONC for its person-centric vision in the Interoperability Roadmap that enables interoperability and empowers patients to demand that their providers and relevant health IT systems be interoperable
  • HIMSS does not support the idea that individual consent should be required for use and disclosure of information if individual consent is not required under applicable law
  •   Regarding security, HIMSS observes that healthcare, as a critical US infrastructure, needs support at many levels to keep data secure and to be positioned to address cyber threats
  •   HIMSS is committed to being a thought leader on interoperability and spurring the community and stakeholder groups forward

HIMSS is committed to continuing our role as a thought leader on advancing the principles described in our public comments and stands ready to work with ONC, federal partners, and all stakeholders to realize an achievable vision for interoperability and health information exchange.

HIMSS’ final comments are available here.

April 3, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

St. Patrick’s Day ICD-10 Codes

Wendy Aiken, Product Manager at ADP AdvancedMD, sent me a few ICD-10 codes that might come in handy during your St. Patrick’s Day shenanigans.

I25.810 Coronary Artery Bypass
Graft Corned beef and cabbage are staples at any St. Patrick’s Day celebration. But if eating too much red meat requires a different kind of CABG, use this code.

L25.2 Unspecified Contact Dermatitis
Due to Dyes Green beer, green clothes, green…well, everything. If someone’s skin is sensitive to the color of the holiday, this code could end up in his or her electronic health records.

H53.50 Unspecified Color Vision Deficiencies
Legend has it that leprechauns hide their gold at the end of the colorful rainbow. Color blindness may make finding the treasure difficult.

D50.8 Hypochromic Anemia
No doubt you may get sick of seeing all the green this St. Patrick’s Day. However, if a patient exhibits a greenish discoloration of skin, he or she may have the real “green sickness”—Hypochromic Anemia.

R44.1 Visual Hallucinations
Leprechauns are a fanciful legend for children. But if you see little green men running around, your doc may use this ICD-10 code.

F40.11 Social Phobia, Generalized
The Irish celebrate St. Paddy’s Day by gathering for large parties and parades. Not everyone loves the chaos of large groups, however. This ICD-10 code is perfect for anyone missing out on festivities due to their fear of crowds.

B27 Infectious mononucleosis
With so many shirts and pins reading “Kiss Me, I’m Irish”, there is bound to be some smooching going on. Irish or not, not all St. Patrick Day partiers will be lucky enough to avoid the “kissing disease.”

I42.6 Alcoholic cardiomyopathy
Drinking green beers year after year may put a hamper on the St. Paddy’s Days in the future. This code is used for what’s been called “beer-drinker’s heart.”

Y92.22 Religious Institution as Place of Occurrence
Some celebrants may observe the religious day of Saint Patrick in a more traditional way. This code may get some use if a trip to the cathedral results in injury.

March 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.