Who Owns Patient Data?

Recently, on The Healthcare Blog, there was a really interesting post by Dr. Marya Silberberg about why patient lab data should be liberated. She recommends lab results be sent to patients at the same time that they’re sent to doctors. Dr. Silberberg does an admirable job of looking at the patient data issue from both sides. From the patient’s perspective, it is really not that hard to understand. If you’ve ever transferred your (paper) records from one doctor to another, or you’ve spent a month or more waiting for your doctor’s office to call you with their interpretation of lab test results, you’ve known the pain. It’s your data, about your body, your health, and you really have no way to access it if you have something of a grinch gatekeeping the records at your doctor’s office.

I’m no doctor, but I get you too. There are way too many paranoid, entitled people in the world, and chances are they’re your patients. Handing patients their lab records is the best way to make sure your office is inundated with callers demanding to talk to the doctor right now, and many of them will just be non-emergency calls.

Having said that, I wasn’t a huge fan of commenter Dr Mike’s response to the post:

“If I ordered the test, the results should be returned to me first, if you ordered the test, the results can come to you. So go order your own lab tests and then you won’t have to wait for me to get through that mountain of paper on my desk. Not sure your insurer will want to play along as you play doctor though

Part of the problem is that patients don’t understand that I am not on retainer for them. In the good ol’ days the docs cared for their friends and neighbor’s and community, and had a personal and financial interest in each individual. But today I don’t have a contract with you, I have one with your insurer, and together the two of us have pretty much locked you out of the decision process, and you have allowed this to happen.”

 

Whoa, them’s fighting words. Patient data access doesn’t have to be an adversarial experience. If you, the doctor, are spending an inordinate amount of time explaining lab results to patients, it’s only fair you be compensated for your consultancy in some way. And you, the patient, must stop thinking of access to patient data as a zero-cost right you can exercise. A tiered insurance plan offering could very well take care of phone-consultancy and patient-lab-reporting costs. If I or a loved one had a condition that required me to look over lab reports and such, I would happily pay a few dollars extra a month for that privilege. And for all the concerns about how the average user can’t understand what the lab results say, it’s surely not impossible in this day and age that lab reports sent to non-medical recipients be in human readable form.

Check out the post here.